The Labor Day Sale at Orient Watch USA

August 27th, 2014 | No Comments

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With Labor Day weekend coming, the sales are sure popping up! Orient Watch USA has just announced its Labor Day sale. They’re offering the Orient Union for $112.50 shipped and $123.75 shipped for leather and stainless steel versions, respectively. The code is laborday2014. The sale ends September 1, 2014 at 11:59 PM PST server time. Here’s the full line up: http://orientwatchusa.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=ev0s

Starting a Watch Collection for under $1000 – The Variety Pack

August 19th, 2014 | 2 Comments

New to watches? Thinking about starting a collection? Lets face it, watch buying and collecting can be addicting and time consuming. But once you’ve gotten bit by the watch bug, it is hard to stop, and there will always be one more watch you need to ‘complete’ your collection. As many a WIS can attest to, this can get expensive–especially when dealing with mechanical watches–but it doesn’t have to be. We’ll show you how you viable it is to start a fantastic watch collection (with a limited number of quartz pieces mixed in) for under $1000, a price that would probably net you only one watch from another brand.

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Lets start off with a so called ‘variety pack’. This variety pack would be perfect for someone who has just started wearing watches and/or collecting and wants to have all their bases covered. It would also be wonderful for someone who has an eclectic personality and participates in a variety of activities.

_DSC1468 - CopyFirst up is the Orient Ray (on rubber). It dons a sporty vibe that’ll look great while taking a dip in the pool, hot tub or afternoon on the beach. With its rubber strap it’s lightweight and easy to clean. It is also a prime candidate for strap swapping (just think: with a black leather strap, it’ transformed to a dressier watch!) Available in blue and black for a classic diver look or in orange for a very sporty but old school 70s diver feel. $260.

 

angle on front LSFor the more formal occasions, the Orient Symphony is a must. With classic designs and a modern flair, the Symphony is a watch that is both timeless and up to date. Sharp dauphine hands and tapered indices keep the classic styling and the 41mm case makes the watch very practical for the modern wearer. Add on the date complication and the Symphony is ready for daily wearing whenever you want to add class to your outfit. Available in a multitude of dial colors and case materials, from stainless steel to gold tone to rose tone. Starting at $210.

 

_DSC9919 - CopyNo watch collection is complete without a bona fide pilot’s watch. The Flight is an ode to the B-type flieger watches of the past but with generous amounts of lume, making it ideal for those late nights. The 42mm case will provide a great wrist presence and high contrast dial is perfect for quick glances and telling time. Outside of the Orient Ray or Mako, this might be the ultimate casual sport watch. Available in a multitude of colors. Starting at $295.

 

neo 70s 9087 PSed - CopyMany collectors debate if you should have at least one chronograph in your collection or if it’d be better to spend that money on a vintage piece. The Focus Chronograph is a two for one. It’s got a look that’s straight out of the 1970s (check out those hands!) but with the modern convenience of a 39mm case and date window. The Focus’ chronograph tri-compact layout will meet all your timing needs. The faceted crystal works perfect with the subtle dial gradient on the dial that truly makes for a unique timepiece. Available in four distinct colors! $225.

Add all of these up and we are $10 shy of our limit– the total is $990, which is completely unheard of when dealing with three mechanical pieces and one spiffy quartz.

What to Wear and How to Wear it: The Top Travel GMT/Dual Time Watches

August 11th, 2014 | No Comments

Being an international business man, world traveler, or simply vacationing away from home, it can be difficult operating on two different time zones. Keeping track of what time to make a phone call, get to a meeting, or when to catch a flight is stressful enough without the added hassle of adding or subtracting time zones. It can definitely add a wrinkle to your day. That’s when a GMT or dual time watch comes in handy. A GMT or dual time complication allows a watch to track two different time zones at the same time (if you need more than this, a world timer might be the way to go). No more doing the math to figure out what time it is in New York City or London when you are catching a flight out of Rome or constantly readjusting the time on your watch. A GMT watch works like this: the primary time zone is shown in the 12 hour format with the second time zone displayed in the 24 hour format either as a disk or an additional hand. Its without a doubt a simple way to multitask. Here are some great options:

FDH00001B0 Explorer.Still013The Explorer

A great start would be with the Explorer, which is great, you guessed it, exploring. The inclusion of the slide rule in the inner bezel along with the 44.5mm case makes this a sportier piece, but the addition of a leather strap (with a deployment clasp) and polished case makes tilts it toward the dressier side. The dial may look busy at first, but once you look a little closer, you’ll notice that everything has been laid out logically, with the second time zone presented in separate time wheel at the 10 o’clock position. The Explorer can easily be dressed up or down, perfect for the business meeting or enjoying that extra day you tacked onto your work trip to experience the city. It’s available in a variety of dial colors, from a high contrast all black to a panda-like display. $715

voyager 8571 PSed - CopyThe Voyager

We mentioned that the Explorer was a great sport/dress hybrid (that’s a bit more on the dressy side), so it’s only right that we introduce the Voyager, which could be seen as a sport/dress hybrid that is more on the sporty side. We say this because it boasts a 100m water resistance that’s reinforced with screwed down crowns. And while it has all the features of the Explorer, the polished case and bracelet just exude more of a masculine, do-it-all look. With all the intricacies, we think its a fantastic conversation starter. So from the beach to the boardroom, this is your watch. If you want a pure sport version of the Voyager, it’s also available in an IP coated black case. $715-$800

SDJ00002WO Star Seeker.Still028Orient Star Seeker GMT

If you need two more time zones, but don’t want to deal with a world timer, we’ve got the watch for you. The Orient Star Seeker is capable of tracking 3 separate time zones at once. This is how it works: Your first time zone is displayed by the hour hand in the 12 hour format, followed by the red GMT hand displaying your second time zone in the 24 hour format displayed on the inner bezel. Finally, by independently rotating the inner bezel that displays the 24 hour scale, you can display the third time zone. With 3 time zones, you won’t have an excuse for not know what time it is back home. Like the Explorer, the Orient Star Seeker GMT is a versatile watch–while it does possess some classic cues, it could be dressed down for a sportier look with a leather strap. Available in black and white. $1,100

Is it Classic or Sporty? – A Review of the Dyno Alarm Chronograph

August 8th, 2014 | No Comments

_DSC2151 - CopyThe Dyno walks a fine line. Its a classic watch with sports influence, or is it sports watch with classic watch influence?

The presentation of the watch points directly towards a classic dress watch. On the other hand the functionality of the watch points directly towards a sports watch.

Lets begin with the presentation. Both the FTD09004B0 and FTD09005W0 are cased in a polished rose gold tone stainless steel case, with polished rose gold tone hands and markers on leather bands (4B on black, 5W on brown). The 4B is on black dial, which the 5W is on white dial with a contrasting black slide ruler. The through use of polished rose gold tone for the case as well as the dial accents visually leads the wearer to associate the watch as a piece meant for a dressy occasion. If the Dyno Chronograph was presented in a matte or brushed finish, this would be a different story.

Now for the functionalities of the watch, which are very sporty. First and foremost the functionality that stands out immediately is the chronograph. The subdials on the dial and pusher on the side of the case visually increase the complication of the watch, though with that thought in mind, the watch is laid out very clearly and very legibly. Adding to the functionality is the slide ruler along the inner bezel, which is controlled by the crown at the 10 o’clock position. The most interesting and unusual complication seen on the Dyno is the alarm function at the 6 o’clock subdial. Not often seen on modern pieces anymore, aside from telling the time, the alarm can be one of the most useful tools on the watch. The more complications a watch has, the sportier it looks and feels, which is certainly the case with the Dyno. But the classy packaging and presentation as a unique effect on the Dyno, creating a marriage between sport and dress.

Not strictly a dress watch, yet not strictly a sports watch; the Dyno walks the line and does it with grace. It is a timepiece that can easily be dressed up or dressed down at a moments notice while not looking out of place doing either.

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The Watchmaker’s Four – Why some watches use “IIII” instead of “IV”

August 5th, 2014 | No Comments

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With all the coverage of the new Bambino online, you may have noticed something odd on the dial of the new Bambinos, particularly the Roman numeral markers. If you haven’t, let us point it out–it’s at the 4 o’clock position. See it? Instead of “IV” it’s “IIII”. Naturally, “IV” is how 4 is represented in Roman numerals. So why does the watch use “IIII” in its place? Is it a mistake?

It’s not. And other watch companies do this, too.

While there are many speculations and stories behind this, ranging from King of France’s Louis the XIV’s request to traditional Roman grammar, it’s commonly believed that its purpose is for improved dial symmetry. The “IIII” mirrors the “VIII” much better than a “IV” can. This is a practice that dates back to the beginning of clock and watchmaking. Though not all watches and clocks take part in this style, we most certainly prefer it!